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20121008
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PBS
Oct 8, 2012 5:30pm EDT
view of the religion. the religion of the book is not called islam. it is very heavily fictionalized. >> have you ever regretted writing it? >> i have been asked this question once a week for 24 years. the answer will always be no. i think it is a good buck. -- good book. people are finally being able to read it as a novel. young people, they are just coming to it fresh. some people love it, some people do not like it. >> you did not have an ordinary life. you were in hiding. you had an alias. what was your state of mind? >> very up and down. the first couple of years were very difficult. going back and looking at my journals at that time, which i have not looked at since then, it is quite obvious the person writing the journal's is very often in a state of the depression. it got easier, i felt, once i was able to begin to organize some kind of political resistance and develop a campaign with the help of a couple of human rights organizations and france to try to put pressure on european and -- your pet -- european governments to put pressure on the iranians. >> in this
PBS
Oct 8, 2012 6:00pm EDT
muslim. but one trying to understand the religion and your role in it. >> i mean i grew up in a family in which there was very little religion. my father wasn't religious at all. but he was really interested in the subject of, you know, the birth and growth of islam. he basically transmitted that interest to me. so when i studied history at cambridge, i did a special subject in that exactly. while i was studying it was where i came across the so-called incident of the satanic verses. >> brown: you say in the book you noted good story. >> 20 years later i find out how good a story it was. >> brown: you wrote when you finished the satanic verses you thought it was the least political of the novels you had written at the time. you were genuinely surprised at what had happened. >> i thought i was very respectful about islam. yes from a secular point of view but it talks about the birth of this religion and i thought it was pretty admiring of the person at the center of it, the prophet of islam. >> brown: what did you think you were doing? what did you think you were saying about the religi
PBS
Sep 30, 2012 4:00pm EDT
actually thinks. remember how barack obama was hurt by the statement about clinging to guns and religion, same dynamic. what does he believe behind closed doors about you? and that's the other piece of that that's effective. you can identify with those people on the screen. and you can say even if you do pay federal income taxes, that was really an attack about people like me. i think that's the most effective ad the obama campaign has run. >> do you think voters expect honesty from the candidates? >> we know that voters tell us that they don't like attack in politics. and they don't like deception in politics. we know that attack can move voters. and we know that deception can move voters who aren't informed and and anchored in the facts. but we also know that voters value honesty and we know it through indirect evidence. we know that when the republicans successfully lodge the charge in 2000 that al gore wasn't trustworthy, and they did it in part with an ad that played on his statement about playing a role in the creation of the internet, that it hurt perceptions of his trustworthines
PBS
Oct 7, 2012 4:00pm EDT
common values in regard to the family, to religion. >> abortion. >> abortion. issues on that. >> gay marriage. they're very conservative. that's basically what changed everything. i remember reading an article where president bush was asked what was one of his biggest regrets. he said, not passing immigration reform. as a republican and having a republican congress he could not convince his own party to support immigration reform. we focus only on the undocumented immigrants. i think that that's -- that that's what's happening, that when people perceive latinos, first thing that pops into their mind is immigrants and undocumented immigrants or like they say illegal aliens which is a term we don't like to use. they don't realize that 74% are americans, are citizens either by birth or naturalized. so the majority of latinos are americans and we have a buying power of over a trillion dollars. if latinos in the u.s. were a country, we would be the 14th largest economy in the world. they're 2.5 billion businesses that are latino owned. we are a very important part of this country. we cont
PBS
Oct 2, 2012 11:00pm EDT
people to communicate even if they don't speak the same language, they have different religions. >> rose: so when you left la scala, why did you leave? >> as i said, i was in la is a la for 19 years, scala for 19 years, even longer than -- >> and my relationship with the orchestra and the chorus has always been for 19 years perfect. then when i had a fight with the administration, let's say, because i don't want to indicate this or that person, and everything became political, and in italy, when something becomes political, and the controversial, politically speaking, then the only thing that you can do is to leave. but 19 years are a part of my best years in my musical career, so i said, you know,, to explain exactly details of what happened is impossible, and the newspapers generally made a mess of the entire story, because they didn't know exactly the details. they thought that the orchestra was against me, but this is not true. >> rose: not true. >> absolutely not true. i never had a fight with an orchestra in my life. but there were reasons outside of the artistic field tha
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5